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Chris -- 2018-04-11

#1 2018-01-01 03:28:14

Dixon Wragg
Eggcornista
From: Cotati, California
Registered: 2008-07-04
Posts: 1306

"kitcheree" or "kitcherie" for "kedgeree", etc.

From Wikipedia:
“Kedgeree (or occasionally kitcherie, kitchari, kidgeree, kedgaree, kitchiri, or khichuri) is a dish consisting of cooked, flaked fish (traditionally smoked haddock), boiled rice, parsley, hard-boiled eggs, curry powder, butter or cream and occasionally sultanas…In India, khichari (among other English spellings) usually refers to any of a large variety of legume-and-rice dishes.”

I recently encountered this:

Kitcheree for breakfast. Doesn’t look like much, but sure tastes good!
a friend’s post

Googling “kitcheree” yields lots of hits, though not nearly as many as the older, more authentic “kedgeree”. Just as the British form of the Indian dish called “kedgeree” evolved in an anglicized direction, it appears that the word itself may have become anglicized. While “kitcheree” and “kitcherie” are now considered correct variations, I’m guessing that the mutation from “kedgeree” (and similar terms) to “kitcheree” or “kitcherie” may have been an eggcornical process. In other words, some if not all users of “kitcheree/kitcherie” may, on some level, have assumed an etymological meaning connection with “kitchen”, or perhaps with notorious English imperialist Lord Kitchener, who plied his nasty trade in India for quite awhile. Absent a perp confession, we may never know, but I have put the question to my friend who posted that sentence, and will pass on to you Eggcorn enthusiasts any enlightenment I may receive. Until then, I tentatively proffer this as a newly-discovered eggcorn.

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#2 2018-01-03 05:36:22

Peter Forster
Eggcornista
From: UK
Registered: 2006-09-06
Posts: 1019

Re: "kitcheree" or "kitcherie" for "kedgeree", etc.

Googling “kitcheree” yields lots of hits, though not nearly as many as the older, more authentic “kedgeree”.

Dixon, you may be mistaken in thinking ‘kedgeree’ is the acorn if Hobson-Jobson, that venerable Anglo-Indian dictionary, is anything to go by, and in such matters it is usually reliable. Lots of references there to kitcheree and kitchery from the 1600s and earlier for example. Now you’ve made the association of course, this new direction of drift means it is difficult not to think of Kitchener as Lord Kedgener, his bristling imperialism accompanied by hard-boiled eggs, smoked fish and mango pickle.

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#3 2018-01-03 07:15:47

Dixon Wragg
Eggcornista
From: Cotati, California
Registered: 2008-07-04
Posts: 1306

Re: "kitcheree" or "kitcherie" for "kedgeree", etc.

Hmmm…I may be wrong about which is the acorn and which the eggcorn, Peter. I was judging on the basis of the overwhelming dominance of “kedgeree” in terms of usage since around 1780. The ngram is confusing, as it says “Search for “kitchery” yielded only one result. Search for “kitcheree” yielded only one result. Ngrams not found: kitcherie”, but also seems to indicate “kitcheree” and “kitchery” predating “kedgeree” as you suggest. I’m tempted to delete this whole thread now, but will leave it in case it’s of interest to anyone at some point…

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#4 2018-01-03 09:57:16

David Bird
Eggcornista
From: Montréal, QC
Registered: 2009-07-28
Posts: 1574

Re: "kitcheree" or "kitcherie" for "kedgeree", etc.

There is a calmer version that involves large-eyed waifs with bonnets and baskets.

Nobody has only good or only bad karma, we all have jumbled up karma, what we call “kitschery” in India. Have you ever had a “kitschery” ? If you go to India you must have it, remember that ! It’s actually a mixture of everything : mainly rice, but then you add meat, vegetables, anything you can take hold of, and then you make a “kitschery”. It’s the easiest thing to cook, and it’s delicious. All the bachelors in India eat kitscheries. Our karma is a “kitschery”, so you get everything in it.

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