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#1 2007-10-30 14:17:12

Peter Forster
Eggcornista
From: UK
Registered: 2006-09-06
Posts: 1019

injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

While this may be no more than a spelling mistake, there remains the possible image of a liquified problem being easier to swallow/accept, or that medicines are sometimes taken in juice to disguise or mask unpleasant flavours?

I didn’t find that it did injuice sleep but it certainly helped me relax after a hard day. It would be better if it contained an added moisturiser and was …
www.eumom.com/ie/forum/topic.asp?ARCHIV … hichpage=4 – 55k – Cached

North East and based their entire story around Newcastle United and the football injuiced passion that embraces so many people in this city. ...
www.cheapcds.co.uk/dvds/B000BKXCCC/reviews-2.html – 19k – Cached

In a alcohol injuiced state last night I agreed to go. Hubby is staying home, so quick ride saturday morning up the M5/M6 :wacko: :wacko: ...
s4.invisionfree.com/ScooterboyWorld/index.php?showtopic=10663 – 89k – Cached

the place where a man can pull the most retarded drug injuiced face n no1 bats an eyelid… Male, 23 “Welcome, mystery person…to My Adventur…” ...
gman-limerick.bebo.com/

... and the waves of nausea it injuiced on its way down that night were answered twofold by the spasms of pain it injuiced on its way out the next day. ...
angrylondoner.blogspot.com/2006/07/un-amour-de-rugger-part-five.html – 66k – Cached

I had my youngest injuiced he was 2 weeks over the due date. Went in on the Thursday morning, had the pessary, along with 3 other overdue ladies. ...
board.dogbomb.co.uk/archive/index.php/t-39514.html – 35k – Cached

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#2 2007-10-30 14:27:45

jorkel
Eggcornista
Registered: 2006-08-08
Posts: 1456

Re: injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

Most of those indeed sound like genuinely naive utterances (and hence eggcorns).

I particularly like the one about the “alcohol injuiced state” which must have been derived from the slang term for intoxication, “getting juiced.” I can’t tell whether that one is intentional, but it’s hilarious.

I found one other “alcohol injuiced” example which doesn’t quite feel as if it would fit with your list…

BBC – Reading and Leeds 2007 – Festival Tips
e.g on my weekend; drug busts, rubber pirateships , balloon fights & starting a 100 people+ parade on sunday night singing like alcohol injuiced crazies ...
www.bbc.co.uk/readingandleeds/2007/bbcberkshire/... – 94k – Similar pages
http://www.bbc.co.uk/readingandleeds/20 … tips.shtml

Last edited by jorkel (2007-10-30 14:30:36)

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#3 2007-10-30 15:08:40

JonW719
Eggcornista
From: Colorado
Registered: 2007-09-05
Posts: 285

Re: injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

I think this is one where British pronunciation may be a factor, no? To my American ear, the way many Brits say “dew,” for example, sounds similar to “djoo,” more of an “dyu” sound than a flat “doo” sound as we would say in the U.S. All the examples given appear to be from British sources, so maybe that is the source of the “juiced” for “duced.”

Last edited by JonW719 (2007-10-30 15:09:16)


Feeling quite combobulated.

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#4 2007-10-31 19:46:04

fishbait1
Eggcornista
From: Cambridge MA
Registered: 2006-09-13
Posts: 54
Website

Re: injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

I agree with Jon—this is English spelling-by-ear, rather than a true eggcorn.

I think of the introduction of the “y” sound (palatalization, I think it’s called) with a change in the preceding “d” as not just British, but upper-class and rather old fashioned British. I believe anyone with what was once called a “huntin’ and shootin’” accent would always say “Injuh” for “India.”

Of course, “Injun” was once lower-class American, as in “rye ‘n’ Injun” bread made with rye and corn flour. I’m sure that this has been well researched, and if I had the time I’d take it further. Anyone?

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#5 2007-11-01 11:18:14

Peter Forster
Eggcornista
From: UK
Registered: 2006-09-06
Posts: 1019

Re: injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

It’s worse than Jon suspects – ‘dew’ for many Brits is indistinguishable from ‘jew’; duplicate/juplicate, duress/juress, duration/juration and sand ‘junes’ all register hits, with some from US sites. There are even 5 hits for “jewelling banjos!”
David, dropping the ‘g’ in words like “huntin’” is very common in lower class speech but may well have been an upper-class speech habit emphasising the gulf separating them from the aspiring middle classes far below. A ‘dy’ sound in the examples above is pretty standard now and certainly wouldn’t be considered upper-class.
However, I recollect a young woman from that strata of society which insists on pronouncing the word ‘house’ as if it rhymed with ‘mice’, referring to a juke-box as a ‘duke’ (dyook) box.

and some of those tackles, well you felt them. Afterwards we put loads of 80’s trash on the duke box and nurses some beers. I drank some … <d…
http://veritasuk.livejournal.com/

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#6 2007-11-01 11:51:11

jorkel
Eggcornista
Registered: 2006-08-08
Posts: 1456

Re: injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

I don’t think the pronunciation is necessarily the end of the story. Yes, it points to eye dialect, but you also have to evaluate imagery. Certainly it makes no sense to have a baby “injuiced” (as in Peter’s sixth example). But it does make a lot of sense for an intoxicated person to be “injuiced.” (The question there becomes one of intentional usage). But then there’s intermediate ground—Peter’s second example—“football injuiced passion,” which conjures up the image of sport action causing one’s juices to flow. Eggcornicity is still pending for me.

Last edited by jorkel (2007-11-01 11:52:10)

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#7 2007-11-04 01:07:07

patschwieterman
Administrator
From: California
Registered: 2005-10-25
Posts: 1665

Re: injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

Well, despite my rep as the most stubborn skeptic among the regulars (yes, I’m still convinced “ciphering gas” is merely a malaprop), I’m kinda partial to this one, and I lean towards assent with Joe’s analysis. A number of these examples appear to see a certain state as having been induced by something swallowed or injected or hormonally secreted; “juice” as an image works pretty well in those instances. Joe’s right that the final eg. seems like the odd man out, but again, if the writer was envisioning an injection or something coursing through the bloodstream, such an idea might salvage even that one.

And I love “duke box,” whether it’s an eggcorn or not.

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#8 2017-12-14 15:51:27

JuanTwoThree
Eggcornista
From: Spain
Registered: 2009-08-15
Posts: 434

Re: injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

This from a website where I had mentioned my interest in such things

had a corker at work recently – I was cc’ed into an email a contractor had written to one of our clients: “I think it is only fair that (Client Name Here) pay their Jews”. He even capitalised it correctly. When I called him he said he’d always assumed the phrase was about “paying Jews back because they were famous for lending money”.

!!

Last edited by JuanTwoThree (2017-12-14 15:53:16)


On the plain in Spain where it mainly rains.

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#9 2017-12-15 01:03:30

DavidTuggy
Eggcornista
From: Mexico
Registered: 2007-10-11
Posts: 2185
Website

Re: injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

A perp’s confession: the gold standard. I pay my Amish , if not my Jews.


*If the human mind were simple enough for us to understand,
we would be too simple-minded to understand it* .

(Possible Corollary: it is, and we are .)

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#10 2017-12-15 14:53:46

yanogator
Eggcornista
From: Ohio
Registered: 2007-06-07
Posts: 184

Re: injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

The pronunciation isn’t purely British. I remember well on the TV program Bewitched, there was an occasional character named Duke, and Samantha’s pronunciation was definitely “Juke”.


“I always wanted to be somebody. I should have been more specific.” – Lily Tomlin

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#11 2017-12-16 08:11:44

Dixon Wragg
Eggcornista
From: Cotati, California
Registered: 2008-07-04
Posts: 1313

Re: injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

yanogator wrote:

...I remember well on the TV program Bewitched, there was an occasional character named Duke, and Samantha’s pronunciation was definitely “Juke”.

Years ago I was playing host to a woman visiting from England. In the course of conversation, she used a word I didn’t recognize: “chooda”. Even after I had her repeat it in context a couple of times, I couldn’t decipher the meaning. Finally, I had her spell it. T-u-d-o-r!

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#12 2017-12-16 13:09:46

JuanTwoThree
Eggcornista
From: Spain
Registered: 2009-08-15
Posts: 434

Re: injuice/injuiced for induce/induced

Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes get called the Ashbury Dukes. A lot.

https://www.google.com/search?q=%22ashb … e&ie=UTF-8

Last edited by JuanTwoThree (2017-12-16 13:13:59)


On the plain in Spain where it mainly rains.

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