Eggcorn Forum

Discussions about eggcorns and related topics

You are not logged in.

Announcement

Registrations are currently closed because of a technical problem. Please send email to if you wish to register.

The forum administrator reserves the right to request users to plausibly demonstrate that they are real people with an interest in the topic of eggcorns. Otherwise they may be removed with no further justification. Likewise, accounts that have not been used for posting may be removed.

Thanks for your understanding.

Chris -- 2018-04-11

#1 2008-03-12 02:01:36

CainEnabled
Member
Registered: 2008-03-12
Posts: 3

"Buyer Be Aware"

I came across this while reading user reviews of a wireless router. I found it quite humorous. The correct form is, of course, “buyer beware,” derived from the Latin expression caveat emptor, which translates to “let the buyer beware.” However, the alternative has a similar, albeit less forbidding, connotation.

Here is the link to the review:

http://reviews.cnet.com/routers/netgear … &tag=uolst

Offline

 

#2 2008-03-12 12:05:37

CainEnabled
Member
Registered: 2008-03-12
Posts: 3

Re: "Buyer Be Aware"

Here’s another usage from the NY Times (surprising):

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/19/magaz … yt&emc=rss

Offline

 

#3 2008-03-12 12:24:26

nilep
Eggcornista
Registered: 2007-03-21
Posts: 291

Re: "Buyer Be Aware"

Is this really a difference, though? As CainEnabled suggests, “buyer beware” is a common translation of caveat emptor “let the buyer be warned.” Both beware and aware come from Middle English war “careful, aware, wary,” and both mean essentially the same thing. The main difference is that aware is an adjective, and beware is a verb.

A Google search for “buyer beware” returns about 2,190,000 raw results; “buyer be aware” about 18,000. I would suggest that the former is a more common, perhaps lexicalized, calque of the Latin, but both mean the same thing.

Note the use of “beware” in the URL and “be aware” (plus caveat emptor) in the text of the following:

Buyer – Be Aware! Know the Law! Montana is not Buyer Friendly. The principles of CAVEAT EMPTOR still apply in Montana when the purchase of a pre-owned residence is involved.
http://www.montanahereicome.com/beware.htm

Last edited by nilep (2008-03-12 12:25:40)

Offline

 

#4 2008-03-12 17:11:09

CainEnabled
Member
Registered: 2008-03-12
Posts: 3

Re: "Buyer Be Aware"

nilep wrote:

Is this really a difference, though? As CainEnabled suggests, “buyer beware” is a common translation of caveat emptor “let the buyer be warned.” Both beware and aware come from Middle English war “careful, aware, wary,” and both mean essentially the same thing. The main difference is that aware is an adjective, and beware is a verb.

A Google search for “buyer beware” returns about 2,190,000 raw results; “buyer be aware” about 18,000. I would suggest that the former is a more common, perhaps lexicalized, calque of the Latin, but both mean the same thing.

Note the use of “beware” in the URL and “be aware” (plus caveat emptor) in the text of the following:

Buyer – Be Aware Know the Law Montana is not Buyer Friendly. The principles of CAVEAT EMPTOR still apply in Montana when the purchase of a pre-owned residence is involved.
http://www.montanahereicome.com/beware.htm

Good points, and I may be splitting hairs, however, I believe that being apprised of something (as in aware), operates differently than being warned (as in beware), both in the legal and contextual sense. By using the former a buyer is warned that there is risk inherent in a particular transaction, while the latter merely conveys that one should take note. I should hope that all buyers are aware of the transaction in which they are entering.

With respect to the Montana link, again I would submit that the two are not interchangeable as the author seems to indicate.

Offline

 

Board footer

Powered by PunBB
PunBB is © 2002–2005 Rickard Andersson
Individual posters retain the copyright to their posts.

RSS feeds: active topicsall new posts