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Chris -- 2015-05-30

#1 2017-04-08 15:19:14

DavidTuggy
Eggcornista
From: Mexico
Registered: 2007-10-11
Posts: 2071
Website

andante < al dente

The pasta was just perfectly cooked, not too hard, not too soft, just kind of andante.

(This was contributed by one of my most prolific sources. She is a wonder!)

Andante is kind of midway between largo and presto, so it fits, synaesthetically or something.


*If the human mind were simple enough for us to understand,
we would be too simple-minded to understand it* .

(Possible Corollary: it is, and we are .)

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#2 2017-04-12 13:21:06

kem
Eggcornista
From: Victoria, BC
Registered: 2007-08-28
Posts: 2536

Re: andante < al dente

I wonder if this is an eggcorn in Italian.


Hatching new language, one eggcorn at a time.

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#3 2017-08-10 22:33:29

DavidTuggy
Eggcornista
From: Mexico
Registered: 2007-10-11
Posts: 2071
Website

Re: andante < al dente

Andante is kind of midway between largo and presto

Actually, now that I think of it, I probably meant al dente is kind of midway between (fusilli) lunghi and pesto.

Last edited by DavidTuggy (2017-08-10 22:36:53)


*If the human mind were simple enough for us to understand,
we would be too simple-minded to understand it* .

(Possible Corollary: it is, and we are .)

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#4 2017-08-14 20:00:00

yanogator
Eggcornista
From: Ohio
Registered: 2007-06-07
Posts: 140

Re: andante < al dente

kem wrote:

I wonder if this is an eggcorn in Italian.

I don’t think so. “Al dente” means “to the tooth”, and “andante” means “walking”, so I don’t think Italian speakers would make this mistake.


“I always wanted to be somebody. I should have been more specific.” – Lily Tomlin

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#5 2017-08-25 11:55:43

Peter Forster
Eggcornista
From: UK
Registered: 2006-09-06
Posts: 975

Re: andante < al dente

It seems there are many restaurants with the name of this rather obvious simbling, which could also mean 100% Italian given Dante’s status. Shame no Beatrice, though.

In his words, “Al you always perfectly cook the pasta, it’s always all dante”. I have come to assume he means al dente, the Italian word for being …

.Nothing spoils it more than over cooked,I like all vegetables all-dante,I think it’s really important to add veggies at the very end.

Overall it was a decent and authentic Italian meal. ... cooked rather unevenly with some bits remaining far too all dante and hard to swallow.

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#6 2017-08-25 17:24:03

DavidTuggy
Eggcornista
From: Mexico
Registered: 2007-10-11
Posts: 2071
Website

Re: andante < al dente

I’d rather they left the rice unbeaten.


*If the human mind were simple enough for us to understand,
we would be too simple-minded to understand it* .

(Possible Corollary: it is, and we are .)

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