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Chris -- 2018-04-11

#26 2018-07-21 19:08:49

Dixon Wragg
Eggcornista
From: Cotati, California
Registered: 2008-07-04
Posts: 1313

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

DavidTuggy wrote:

But not “he is a banana”.

Nor is she a cracker (in the sense we’re using here), or a pregger, or a bonker.

In fact, for me you can’t be bananas but must go it/them, while the other ones meaning “crazy” you can either be or go. Hmm.

I have commonly seen/heard a person or a situation described as “bananas” without the “go”.

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#27 2018-07-23 14:34:21

DavidTuggy
Eggcornista
From: Mexico
Registered: 2007-10-11
Posts: 2185
Website

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

Right. “He is a nut” is the exception.
.
OK, our dialects or idiolects must be different on the issue of “bananas” without the “go”. I think I might just barely do “be all bananas”, though.


*If the human mind were simple enough for us to understand,
we would be too simple-minded to understand it* .

(Possible Corollary: it is, and we are .)

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#28 2018-08-01 13:28:52

Peter Forster
Eggcornista
From: UK
Registered: 2006-09-06
Posts: 1019

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

David T wrote:

A cracker, whether or not from Georgia, is certainly a pluralizable noun, but I am not used to referring to a person who is crackers as a cracker.

How odd that seems. From where I’m sitting, someone who is crackers is cracked and therefore must be a cracker. But someone who is good crack, that is, skilled at entertaining conversation and gossip, would never be described as a cracker, unless they were also at least a little deranged of course.

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#29 2018-08-01 20:29:57

DavidTuggy
Eggcornista
From: Mexico
Registered: 2007-10-11
Posts: 2185
Website

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

Yes, cracked, for sure. But being cracked does not make you a cracker, in my dialect, any more than being all the crack does.


*If the human mind were simple enough for us to understand,
we would be too simple-minded to understand it* .

(Possible Corollary: it is, and we are .)

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#30 2018-08-04 04:43:58

DavidTuggy
Eggcornista
From: Mexico
Registered: 2007-10-11
Posts: 2185
Website

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

Lucy Lui was awesome and the gorg man, Sherlock, he was brills. Haven’t seen him in anything else, so I base his acting ability on this alone

[she] took me, particularly, from someone who has never been able to grasp dancing to the delivery of a confident and enjoyable performance….she was brills!

I don’t remember hearing this word, but it rings right to me. It keeps niggling at my mind that I know other British words with this adjectival -s.

Last edited by DavidTuggy (2018-08-04 04:46:58)


*If the human mind were simple enough for us to understand,
we would be too simple-minded to understand it* .

(Possible Corollary: it is, and we are .)

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#31 2018-08-04 05:29:36

Dixon Wragg
Eggcornista
From: Cotati, California
Registered: 2008-07-04
Posts: 1313

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

DavidTuggy wrote:

I don’t remember hearing this word [“brills”], but it rings right to me. It keeps niggling at my mind that I know other British words with this adjectival -s.

I assume “brills” is short for “brilliant”, a common British colloquialism meaning something like “great!”.
Re: other modifiers with the -s ending: I’ve heard “totes” for “totally”, but that’s an adverb, not an adjective, and I’m not sure if it’s used in the UK.

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#32 2018-08-04 11:21:22

DavidTuggy
Eggcornista
From: Mexico
Registered: 2007-10-11
Posts: 2185
Website

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

My granddaughter suggests (totes) adorbs .
.
Strikes me that adorbs , preggers , and brills, as well as totes , involve shortening what is already an adjective (or an adverb in the last case) and then adding the -(er)s. The -s then is not in these cases (as it is in nuts, bonkers, bananas ) a category-changing derivational suffix. (The derivational/inflectional boundary is a very fuzzy one: many affixes function in both categories and many usages are hard to categorize as one or the other.)
.
btw, brill without the -s is used, also meaning “brilliant”.

Last edited by DavidTuggy (2018-08-12 11:01:19)


*If the human mind were simple enough for us to understand,
we would be too simple-minded to understand it* .

(Possible Corollary: it is, and we are .)

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#33 2018-08-12 03:52:31

Dixon Wragg
Eggcornista
From: Cotati, California
Registered: 2008-07-04
Posts: 1313

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

Just encountered this one recently:

my lens are different.
comment on different perspectives

It seems that this perp thinks lens is a plural.

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#34 2018-08-13 10:29:14

yanogator
Eggcornista
From: Ohio
Registered: 2007-06-07
Posts: 184

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

Here in Cincinnati, it is very common to hear “lens are”.


“I always wanted to be somebody. I should have been more specific.” – Lily Tomlin

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#35 2018-08-14 01:49:45

JuanTwoThree
Eggcornista
From: Spain
Registered: 2009-08-15
Posts: 434

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

For what it’s worth that -s does seem to mark an abbreviation in names: Debs, Mags, Emms, Mads. Not all names do this and I don’t know if there’s a pattern to them.

I can add awks, whatevs, forevs and imports to the collection.


On the plain in Spain where it mainly rains.

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#36 2018-08-15 13:58:31

burred
Eggcornista
From: Montreal
Registered: 2008-03-17
Posts: 1104

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

DT wrote:

Lucy Lui was awesome and the gorg man, Sherlock, he was brills.

He was only gorg, not completely gorges.

BTW, Dixes, check on page 1 of this thread for evidence that great minds think a lot.

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#37 2018-08-15 15:42:17

Dixon Wragg
Eggcornista
From: Cotati, California
Registered: 2008-07-04
Posts: 1313

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

burred wrote:

Dixes, check on page 1 of this thread for evidence that great minds think a lot.

Damn! I did look over that page before posting my “lens” comment, but somehow my looking over led to overlooking.

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#38 2018-09-15 18:11:42

David Bird
Eggcornista
From: Montréal, QC
Registered: 2009-07-28
Posts: 1576

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

DavidTuggy wrote:

From today’s version of World Wide Words:
By the way, people sometimes think indices is an English plural and so make a singular noun indice from it (apice and vertice are also very occasionally seen). Examples of indice can be found going back a century or more, not always in uneducated writing. A note by Charles Doyle appeared in the Winter 1979 issue of American Speech: “At a recent academic gathering, a literary savant began his speech with a quotation that spoke of certain indices. Thereafter, at least a dozen times, the speaker referred to this or that indice (ending like jaundice).” It most recently appeared in the Washington Post on 22 August 2008: “Yet as an indice of some of the lines of attack that the McCain camp is employing it is of great interest.” Thus does language change …
.
Presumably these people pronounced the plural to rhyme with jaundices or premis(s)es or promises?
In any case, this is a backformation, but related to what we’ve been talking about. I can easily see people pronouncing it to rhyme with “dice” rather than “jaundice”. Or “ín-de-see”, in another back-formation.
I have recorded several people using “crisee” as the singular of “crises”.
I’m not sure the pronunciation “premisees” was ever standard for me, but I’m sure I have used it.
Times I’ve thought people were using a singular “parenthesis” meaning a set of parentheses, they may have been using a spelling pronunciation of “parentheses” itself, with schwa instead of ee for that last vowel.

From a pertinent post by DT 10 years ago, 2008-08-30, on the “Things you read” thread.

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#39 2018-09-16 20:21:34

yanogator
Eggcornista
From: Ohio
Registered: 2007-06-07
Posts: 184

Re: A number of pathos, ethos and logos were found as well

As a math instructor, I’ve heard “matrice” and “vertice” (pronounced matrisee and vertisee) as the singular of “matrices” and “vertices” far too many times.


“I always wanted to be somebody. I should have been more specific.” – Lily Tomlin

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