Eggcorn Forum

Discussions about eggcorns and related topics

You are not logged in.

Announcement

Registrations are temporarily closed as we're receiving a steady stream of registration spam.

Anyone who wishes to register, please email me at chris dot waigl at gmail dot com with the desired username and a valid email address, and I will register you manually.

Thanks for your understanding.

Chris -- 2011-03-08

#1 2011-01-19 13:51:29

JuanTwoThree
Eggcornista
Registered: 2009-08-15
Posts: 336

Moreish Moorish

When it has absolutely nothing to do with Mauretania, Morocco, North Africa or Andalucia then I reckon it’s an eggcorn for moreish:

http://nzfavouriterecipe.co.nz/recipes/ … roon-slice

http://www.dooyoo.co.uk/food/m-m-s-milk … s/1291279/

unlike when people know that they’re punning:

www.alira.com.au/media/fin_review_090410.pdf

Some discussion here:

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthre … 4&langid=5

Is “moreish” not known in ‘American’?

Last edited by JuanTwoThree (2011-01-19 14:31:33)

Offline

 

#2 2011-01-19 21:08:49

fpberger
Eggcornista
Registered: 2006-08-16
Posts: 130

Re: Moreish Moorish

I think moreish is a UK slang. I’ve heard it from English friends.

Offline

 

#3 2011-01-20 01:17:06

burred
Eggcornista
From: Montreal
Registered: 2008-03-17
Posts: 951

Re: Moreish Moorish

Those Moors were such gourmands.

Moreish is not a common expression here, so if I didn’t see it written, I might wonder whether the reference was to the misty highlands.

The closest we come to moreish would be the s’more. These hypercaloric campfire canap├ęs are made with a roasted marshmallow on a piece of a chocolate bar, sandwiched between two graham wafers. The same spelling shift does not have a similar resonance in this case.

Disney Gay and Lesbian forum I can assure you, “family” does not serve Smoors at a camp night! Light Hors d’overs perhaps, but not Smoors!

Pennsylvania resto review Wonderful food, unique selection and smoors you toast at your table! I can’t wait to try their new breakfast menu.

I only bring it up because it leads to the charming dialect word, smoor, for fire husbandry, from a way back. Smooring, or storing a smouldering part of the fire overnight, was accompanied by prayers.

PEAT is the fuel of the Highlands and Islands. Where wood is not obtainable the fire is kept in during the night. The process by which this is accomplished is called in Gaelic smaladh; in Scottish, smooring; and in English, smothering, or more correctly, subduing. The ceremony of smooring the fire is artistic and symbolic, and is performed with loving care.
http://owen59.wordpress.com/2009/12/

Offline

 

Board footer

Powered by PunBB
PunBB is © 2002–2005 Rickard Andersson
Individual posters retain the copyright to their posts.

RSS feeds: active topicsall new posts