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#1 2014-01-25 11:02:32

Dixon Wragg
Eggcornista
From: Santa Rosa, California
Registered: 2008-07-04
Posts: 633

"split" for "spit"

“Spit second” has been mentioned here in the Eggcorn Forum, but not “roasted on a split” or variations thereof. This first example shows that it’s not always an eggcorn:

Salmon roasted on a split alder branch over an open fire is amazing.
wine column

Nothing eggcornish about that one, but it does hint at the meaning connection people may have in mind when they use “split” even when referring to a metal spit. As most spits nowadays are metal (some dictionaries even specify metal in the definition), I think it’s reasonable to assume that at least some of the examples I found referred to metal spits; thus it’d be eggcornish to refer to them as “splits”, as they’re not split pieces of wood. Also, in addition to being attracted to “split”, some perps may be repelled away from the proper term “spit” because of its unappetizing association with spittle. I found nearly 20 examples, including:

Too bad he’s currently being roasted on a split by a bunch of hungry demons.
discussion thread

Rotisserie Chicken $7.95 – $9.95. our latest taste treat! slow roasted on a split and served with mashed potatoes, vegetables, roll and butter.
menu

As a special delicacy, sometimes a whole bullock gets roasted on a split, which otherwise only exists at the Oktoberfest.
a venue in Munich

You can taste and prepare food either backed in the wood-fired oven (inside a cooking pot) or from the barbecue (roasted on a split).
a venue in Crete

Dan Orlovsky’s part-time job continues as he tries to find someone who has been roasted on a split this week.
TV listings

Mugs of ale and feast of oxen roasted on a split were the rewards given to the serfs.
article about British cuisine

I say it’s an eggcorn! And maybe it’s a new one?

Last edited by Dixon Wragg (2014-01-25 11:04:50)

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#2 2014-01-25 11:52:16

kem
Eggcornista
From: Victoria, BC
Registered: 2007-08-28
Posts: 2119

Re: "split" for "spit"

I like this. “Roasted on a spit” becomes “roasted on a split (branch).”

The ancient Teutonic “spit” has had a number of now-defunct metaphorical applications. Seems like the only modern uses are roasting spits and spits of land. I wonder if “spit of land” might be a hidden eggcorn for some users: a bit of land that projects, like someone projecting saliva?

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