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#126 2014-01-17 13:11:52

DavidTuggy
Eggcornista
From: Mexico
Registered: 2007-10-12
Posts: 1796
Website

Re: Things you read and understood but mispronounced in your mind

Just remembered another one of these from years ago, a sort of counterpart of the teatable paradise of post #95 of this topic. I pondered what particular scandalous behavior a malefactor was guilty of. It was a bit of a disappointment to realize that it was just generalized evil, and that there were no femalefactors.
.
(A quick google reveals that there are many references, especially in writing about infertility, to both male factors and the female factors, but they swamp examples of the sort I tried to look for.)

Last edited by DavidTuggy (2014-01-17 13:23:36)


*If the human mind were simple enough for us to understand,
we would be too simple-minded to understand it* .

(Possible Corollary: it is, and we are .)

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#127 2014-05-27 19:42:30

David Bird
Eggcornista
From: Montréal, QC
Registered: 2009-07-28
Posts: 1204

Re: Things you read and understood but mispronounced in your mind

DT, that reminds me of those who think there might be a femalestrom.

I was pleased to find that another word I mispronounced in my mind, back when I loved reading pirate stories: ague. I thought it rhymed with vague. Like a vague ache. Come to think of it, even earlier, I didn’t have a solid lock on the pronunciation of vague, thinking it rhymed with bag. And so now I stumble whenever I have to pronounce it in French, where it does, vaguely. I think.

I only learned that ague doesn’t rhyme with vague in rereading that poem, that’s be circulating for years, about the quirks of English pronunciation.

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#128 2014-05-27 23:19:35

DavidTuggy
Eggcornista
From: Mexico
Registered: 2007-10-12
Posts: 1796
Website

Re: Things you read and understood but mispronounced in your mind

That has an orthographical metathesis going on too. (All the hits on femaelstrom that I managed to look at were pretty clearly advertent.)


*If the human mind were simple enough for us to understand,
we would be too simple-minded to understand it* .

(Possible Corollary: it is, and we are .)

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#129 2014-12-16 12:46:45

AdamVero
Eggcornista
From: Leeds, UK
Registered: 2007-09-04
Posts: 66
Website

Re: Things you read and understood but mispronounced in your mind

I heard recently that the metathesis of ask /æksis considerably older than many of us assume – it is not a malady of recent youthful undifference, but many generations old and probably should be accepted more as a patois than a (newly made) mistake or laziness. This is no different from “awry”, genuinely pronounced AW-ree in the jive sense of “He gonna be awry [alright]”

The metathesis of spaghetti, pasketti, basketti I think is very interesting. I do like the theory that this example comes through shortening to “sketty” first, then trying to add back in the missing syllable.
Note the very similar switch of sounds in words such as spectacles and spectrum vs telescope and episcopal where the SP and C sounds are reversed, despite all these words having a common original root word. At some point the sounds simply switched (long before all those derivations came about in modern usage of course, they had not at that point invented spectrometers and microscopes).

I have heard dour as both dower and door, usually split between English / Scottish speakers, although I notice many English speakers choosing the “correct” door pronunciation, usually with regard to an adjective applied to a Scot (notably Gordon Brown seems forever tarred with this epithet). I also note that in Scotland there is far more distinction in speech between endings ”-ore” and ”-oor” generally.
“There are far more [MOR] grouse on the moor [MOO-er] this year than last…”
I think dour tends towards the latter of these, so this two-syllable sound is quite close to “dower” really.


Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day; teach a man to fish and he will buy a ridiculous hat – Scott Adams (author of Dilbert)
Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day; set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life – Terry Pratchett
http://blog.meteorit.co.uk

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#130 2014-12-17 06:41:07

Dixon Wragg
Eggcornista
From: Santa Rosa, California
Registered: 2008-07-04
Posts: 657

Re: Things you read and understood but mispronounced in your mind

AdamVero wrote:

The metathesis of spaghetti, pasketti, basketti I think is very interesting. I do like the theory that this example comes through shortening to “sketty” first, then trying to add back in the missing syllable.

I have observed these pronunciations mostly in very young children, except insofar as families have adopted them as a nod to the developmental history of their cute little tykes. Therefore I’ve always assumed that they came about simply through the inarticulateness of youngsters, much as my sister came to be known as “Mimi” because that’s the closest she could come to pronouncing Mary when she was little.

Having said that, I do acknowledge that there are examples of full-grown adults moving consonant sounds around within words. You don’t have to watch too many Food Network shows before you’ll hear chefs and other food experts—who should know better— pronounce chipotle “chipolte” and mascarpone “marscapone”. (And I admit that I cringe a bit every time I hear these.)

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