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#1 2009-07-13 01:37:20

Dixon Wragg
Eggcornista
From: Cotati, California
Registered: 2008-07-04
Posts: 1313

"days of your" for "days of yore"

I ran across this one just today:

”...not to hearken back to the days of your, but now, there’s a pent up demand…” etc.

I’m thinking it may be an eggcorn rather than just a misspelling, as the person writing “days of your” may be thinking of the days of your past, or even the days of your ancestors, which may be a close enough meaning connection to “yore” for this to be a real eggcorn.

Unfortunately, googling doesn’t clarify this, because the phrase “days of your” in this sense gets lost in many millions of g-hits for things like “best days of your life”, etc.

Anyway, what sayest thou, eggcornistas?

Dixon

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#2 2009-07-13 16:03:21

nilep
Eggcornista
Registered: 2007-03-21
Posts: 291

Re: "days of your" for "days of yore"

It seems odd to me, from a sort of cognitive metaphor perspective, that the distant past would be associated with the present listener by using your. Though of course, people who hear days of yore start from the sound, and might make sense of it in just the way Dixon suggests. It sounds rather more like a pail to me, though – part of an expression that can be recognized as an element, though it doesn’t add anything obvious to the meaning of the expression.

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#3 2009-07-13 22:12:03

fpberger
Eggcornista
Registered: 2006-08-16
Posts: 130

Re: "days of your" for "days of yore"

I could see it being related in the mind of the writers to “back in your day”, maybe. It’s not that uncommon. I’ve found some more examples below.

“There was a time, back in the days of your, when leaving your footprint on the planet referred to the good things you has accomplished. ” http://www.helium.com/knowledge/217735- … -footprint

“just as in days of your any self-respecting engineer would carry a sllide-ruke as a badge of office, or just as a medic carries a stethoscope” http://www.abelard.org/sums/teaching_nu … uction.php

“Just as it did in days of your, just as it
does on the other side, just as it will
forevermore.” http://www.weddingsmyway.com/Word/Memor … ochure.pdf

“these were often given as gifts in days of your by a young lady to a possible suitor” http://cgi.ebay.com/Antique-Three-Crown … .m20.l1116

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#4 2009-07-14 02:59:47

Dixon Wragg
Eggcornista
From: Cotati, California
Registered: 2008-07-04
Posts: 1313

Re: "days of your" for "days of yore"

Nice examples, fpberger! How did you find them?

Dixon

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#5 2009-07-15 14:56:21

fpberger
Eggcornista
Registered: 2006-08-16
Posts: 130

Re: "days of your" for "days of yore"

The first one just popped up when I searched “back in the days of your”, but there were also lots of “your childhood”, “your forefathers”, etc. Dropping “the” out of the phrase eliminated many of the “your (noun)” variants.

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#6 2018-06-12 21:00:00

kem
Eggcornista
From: Victoria, BC
Registered: 2007-08-28
Posts: 2632

Re: "days of your" for "days of yore"

There is another eggcorn in the line quoted by Dixon. “Hearken back” for “hark back.” “Hark,” as I mention in my eggcorn book, is a term from fox hunting. “Hearken” is an ancient AS term for “listen.”


Hatching new language, one eggcorn at a time.

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