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#1 2007-07-02 21:19:44

klakritz
Eggcornista
From: Winchester Massachusetts
Registered: 2005-10-25
Posts: 674

'bluff' for 'buff' (as in 'civil war buff')

A buff is an obsessively knowledgeable enthusiast. And when someone is spouting obscure information, it can be hard to tell if they’re bluffing. Examples:

Not a movie bluff at all, I just want to know if Kajol is actually playing a blind girls role.
mboard.rediff.com/board/board.php?boardid=movies2006may26fanraja&page=14

I am also a movie bluff (but not of Hollywood style) and do some jogging.
www.amazon.com/gp/pdp/profile/AP59M2PRBQP5Y

For a movie bluff, being part of the creation is a reward.
www.kinos.ca/main.php?lang=en&page=company

As a cinema bluff, I am well acquainted with the various acting methods, such as,Theatre and well, Method.
community.tvguide.com/blog/Casual-Viewer-Hiatus/800000

OWN YOUR OWN “INTERNATIONAL TIME MACHINE”? PLANE CLOCK. Perfect gift for the aviation bluff.
collectibles.search.ebay.com/_Collectibles_W0QQfmcZ1QQsacatZ1QQsassZancientartfromtheheart


...He probably had a regular job, and was probably a railroad bluff.”
www.jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/ … gine.shtml

Ghost Cadet This book is great for a civil war bluff…
www.zooscape.com/cgi-bin/maitred/WhiteP … 0833587749

...information on many preservation, restoration, and documentation efforts, as well as a detailed calendar of events essential to a lighthouse bluff.
www.lighthousedepot.com/Press/articles.cfm?article=6

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#2 2007-07-02 23:01:09

booboo
Eggcornista
From: Austin, Tx
Registered: 2007-04-01
Posts: 179

Re: 'bluff' for 'buff' (as in 'civil war buff')

Good one! Maybe they think people who spout such information are trying to credit themselves with an expert status they don’t deserve, like Cliff Clavin (“it’s a little known fact”) of Cheers fame. It’s funny to think there are people so skeptically predisposed against all buffs.

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#3 2012-10-04 16:04:17

kem
Eggcornista
From: Victoria, BC
Registered: 2007-08-28
Posts: 2143

Re: 'bluff' for 'buff' (as in 'civil war buff')

While playing poker you can bluff, rebluff, and perhaps even rerebluff (or should that be rebluffbluff?). But when a contractor writes on a homebuilding forum that

“I know somebody [is] going to rebluff my statements about rebar but this is what I do for a living everyday,”

or when a blogger writes this about the painter George Catlin:

“Still pressing for acceptance of his work by the United States Government, he was rebluffed once more in 1856…,”

it seems almost certain that “rebluff” is being employed in a context that requires “rebuff.” Since the “buff” radical did migrate into English with the expanded “rebuff,” it is a lost radical (actually, a never-had radical). Lost radicals are almost always temptations for serial replacers. To bluff, in the sense of warding off by an exaggerated show of force, shares some semantic space with “rebuff.” The “buff” part of “rebuff” originally meant “to puff.”

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#4 2012-10-04 16:19:19

larrybob
Eggcornista
Registered: 2007-12-27
Posts: 91

Re: 'bluff' for 'buff' (as in 'civil war buff')

I think the first example the idiomatic word should be rebut. See elsewhere on the forum ‘rebuffal’ for ‘rebuttal’

There are lots of examples of people using rebuff instead of rebut (or rebluff.)
Disclaimer: “If you represent Sabena, you are welcome to rebuff my statements.”

Gynomastia forum: “If any legitimate answers to the points I raised existed, moobius would have used them to rebuff my position and secure that of his own- he couldn’t do that.”

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#5 2012-10-04 17:06:46

kem
Eggcornista
From: Victoria, BC
Registered: 2007-08-28
Posts: 2143

Re: 'bluff' for 'buff' (as in 'civil war buff')

I think the first example the idiomatic word should be rebut.

“Rebut” or “rebuff” as the acorn for “rebluff.” It’s a tough call, isn’t it? Many contexts fit with both interpretations.

Most of the OED citations of “rebuff,” I note, employ the past participle of the word (“rebuffed”). “Rebluffed” may be more likely to be a permutation of “rebuffed” and “rebluff” a more likely switch for “rebut.”

Examples with “rebluffed:”

Forum post: “Now do I go up to New Ager’s and others and call them Satanists? no. That would be untactful and considered unfriendly, and I would be rebluffed. ”

Web journal: “Each time I have asked to help you move back in you have rebluffed me and come up with excuses.”

Greece/Turkey forum:—- “akhbazian forces were rebluffed three times before the georgians were pushed into the gorge by russian forces”

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#6 2012-10-04 19:09:37

larrybob
Eggcornista
Registered: 2007-12-27
Posts: 91

Re: 'bluff' for 'buff' (as in 'civil war buff')

Here’s another reshaping – perhaps the thinking is that the rebuttal is like a sacrifice bunt in the argument. The word “refute” also works in the idiom but isn’t as close as “rebut.”
Youtube comment: “So you can’t rebunt my point agaisn’t your made up arguments so instead brought up and hide behind other incident that its not exactly the same as Libya.”

Discussion forum: “I didn’t realize you had rebunted any of my claims.”

Discussion forum: “Or would you choose to defend him again with your rebuntal.”

Last edited by larrybob (2012-10-04 19:09:52)

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